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sonori

@sonori@beehaw.org

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sonori ,
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Yep, at the very least there is a reason that all the democracies the US helped establish post world war two, to my knowledge none of them were recommended to closely mirror the US system. The fundamental US government was a decent enough step in the right for a british colony in the 1700s, but there has been over two hundred years of learning and improvements since. The problem is that while nearly everyone who’s studied governmental structures recognizes the problem, it’s very hard to get someone to understand a problem when their job requires not understanding it, and the general public doesn’t have enough knowledge or passion to force the issue.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Functionally, probably? Given most states are sovereign instead of being divided up into zones by security checkpoints managed by a foreign power and which requires citizenship in said foreign power to cross. Between how much influence Isreal has in the government of the West Bank archipelago and the requirement that Palestinians possess a lower tier of Israeli citizenship in order to move from town to town, I don’t think a strong case can be made that the Isrealis have allowed the Palestinians have sovereignty over their own territory.

As such the Palestinian people of the West Bank have been and unfortunately practically remain part of the Israeli state, albeit a horribly discriminated and abused part of it with very good reason to splinter off into their own state. If Isreal had actually followed the UN mandate in the first place there might be a stronger argument that the West Bank and Gaza have always had a sovereign Palestinian government, but they functionally annexed them instead, and as such the West Bank and Gaza are now hopefully splintering off from the government they have been largely barred from participating in on racial grounds.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

While I think in this case they won’t have an effect because no Amarican company is even trying to compete in the space, I feel like claiming “history says tarrifs rarely work” is pretty misleading. The high tarrifs caused by the US generating nearly all federal income by tarrifs in the 17 and 18 hundreds are after all widely credited with being the reason the northern US went from being a minor agricultural nation dependent entirely on european industrial goods to becoming one of the largest industrialized nations so quickly.

Indeed that was why the WTO blocking third world nations from putting tarrifs on western goods was so heavily criticized by the left a few decades ago, before China proved you could do it without said tarrifs so long as your competitors were greedy enough to outsource their industry to you.

Europe's Spending Billions on Green Hydrogen. It's a Risky Gamble ( www.bloomberg.com )

To be clear: we're going to use renewable hydrogen for some things, such as fertilizer manufacturing — there isn't any other way to do them sustainably. There are applications for which it's one of the most expensive choices, such as home heating, and a whole host of industrial processes and aviation sitting in between.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Why are you expecting that hydrogen to be made into electricity? While there are silly ideas like using it in small scale applications like cars or buses, most hydrogen is used to produce things like fertilizer or steel, and while there are newly developed processes that are less reliant on hydrogen, we are unlikely to be able to scale them up drom lab sized for decades.

Being able to replace this hydrogen with stuff made from solar power rather than methane steam reformation would present a major reduction in emissions, and at the rate we are building out renewables it is far more likely that we will have the necessary renewables long before we have scaled up the alternative processes.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Except that is hardly unique to nuclear waste. A wide variety of industrial processes produce high grade chemical waste, especially electronics like computers, solar panels, and inverters. This is just as deadly as any nuclear waste, and if stumbled upon will kill just as quickly in a hundred years, a thousand years, million years, or a billion years.

There is however a well established solution to this problem, and that is making sure the government knows what and where it is as well as that someone it monitoring and securing the site. The actual chemical makeup of the stuff that kills you doesn’t actually matter all that much compared to makeing sure it stays where it’s supposed to be.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Arsenic, mercury, gallium, tellurium, and cadmium are all heavy metal waste products produced in quantity for semiconductor manufacturing, are commonly landfilled, pose extreme risk to human health if they ever managed to leach out of the landfill and into a aquifer, and being heavy metals have no non-nuclear method of decay. Given the primary risk of high grade nuclear is also that it is made up of toxic hevey metals that might be dangerous if lost to the local aquifer, it seems fair to compare the two.

Semiconductor manufacturing also makes heavy use of PFAS materials, which while less directly dangerous to human health still do end up measurably entering and contamating the environment through plant wastewater streams. Once in the environment, these also tend to last for between six hundred to a thousand years before being broken down or sequestered.

I don’t think my society will last a hundreds of thousands of years, but i’m pretty sure a society of people in the area will, and if not, then it isn’t a problem because evidently there is evidently no one around to harm. Structures like landfill barriers are not likely to last that long on their own, and as such it falls on people to renew and maintain them for as long as there are people around anyway. Hence why it is imperative that the local government knows about and monitors the site.

All of this is true regardless of which specific heavy metal or acid is stored at the site, though given the small quantity of nuclear waste makes up of similarly harmful industrial wastes it is going to be easier to manage on that face alone.

Obviously humanity hasn’t made anything that lasted tens of thousands of years, we weren’t building anything significant tens of thousands of years ago. We do however have plenty of local governments and buildings that have lasted thousands of years, and which are probably not going anywhere anytime soon.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

The hard part would things like water and raw building materials, one of the benefits of ground is that it’s mostly iron, oxygen, and other metals, while basically everything on Venus would need to be shipped in from off world.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Trans people know they should be the other gender and that puberty causes massive permanent changes to their body they are horrified by. They often do not know that everyone else around them’s deepest fantasy isn’t to wake up one day as the other sex.

They do not know that there is a easy and harmless way to delay these permanent changes effecting their bodies until they are an adult and can make a informed decision, that if started early enough these medications create a path to eliminate the need for nearly all of the intensive surgeries that are otherwise in their future, can be stoped at any time if they don’t want to continue with it, or that these medications are deemed harmless enough to be freely handed out to their fellow cis children for a wide body of disorders, but which the NHS suddenly requires years of regular therapy trying to talk them out of it to “prove” they are deserving of if there is even a hint of them being trans.

Yes, this means that the NHS has for decades required that the child and their parents must know they are trans and how they feel about the exact effect of puberty years before the child even starts puberty in order to gain the majority of the benefits from these medications which doctors can freely prescribe for non trans children without any of these barriers.

When you talk about the recent UK “research” you are talking about the Cass report yes? The report that outright stated it ignored over a century of scientific research because thouse papers went double blind, meaning they secretly gave an equal number of cis children puberty blockers without their knowledge or gave trans children sugar pills without them realizing they are still going through puberty, which was subsequently ridiculed as a purely politically driven by hundreds of UK pediatricians and experts in the field, who’s authors were actively helping draft policy with American far right politicians that defines a child gaining any acess to puberty blockers or even social transition as child abuse and requiring years of prison time for the parents, and who despite all this own author’s stated that even with their standards that while the NHS gives little support for non-binary children the high barriers it maintains against trans children pausing puberty, socially transitioning, and other forms of gender confirming care are actively harming them.

But hey, if so many people are apparently treating acess to these medications as no big deal dispite all the evidence to the contrary, why do nearly half of trans people in the UK end of having to get these medications from grey market dealers in southern europe instead of their local chemist?

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

The scientists of the 1880s, through every decade up to the modern day were all so terrified of being called transphobes that they secretly conspired to fake the entire field’s research? Right, that makes sense.

You definitely promise that they’d be canceled too, and not given constant interviews by the Daily Mail, Fox News(the largest and most watched television news station in America), and the BBC(looking to show both sides of banning only certain people from getting otherwise uncontroversial and freely prescribed medication). None of thouse outlets would ever be interested in interviewing them say things their editors are pushing for.

They would also certainly not then get millions in dollars to continue their research by groups like the Heritage Foundation, the group which in 2016 focused group tested ways to create new culture war issues and identified the decades old practice of prescribing puberty blockers to children who have fought through years of therapy as one of the effective things for conservative outlets and politicians to push.

Yes, questioning children should be given love, therapy, and the choice to delay the permanent changes brought on by puberty until they are an adult and can make an informed decision, and not forced to because a politician copied an American far right party’s method to distract voters form the impacts of their economic policies by screwing over the thirty thousand English who are physically incapable of otherwise loving their own bodies.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

So what your saying is that you have gone through years of therapists telling you not to transition every two weeks, and accidentally been given a medication that delayed the decision until you were more mature and which you could stop taking at any time with no serious side effects. Turely that was a fate so horrible that it’s worth taking the decision away from the thirty thousand English for which it was demonstrably the right decision.

We need to talk about Chinese and US influence in Europe’s energy industry, European researchers say ( theconversation.com )

The EU’s climate agenda is in trouble. The Green Deal, which aims to slash the bloc’s carbon emissions by 55% by 2030, had started off promisingly after several major pieces of legislation were adopted, including its ban on the sale of new combustion-powered vehicles from 2035 and new carbon border tax....

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

You mean free trade policies might result in foreign companies coming in and outcompeting local ones here instead of just allowing our companies to go into, take over, and outcompete their ones? How could this happen? Who could have possibly predicted this turn of events? How could anyone else’s companies come in and do unto us exactly what we’ve been doing to them for the last half century?

Why, next your going to tell me that in a free market a company with lower labor costs that is willing to slash profit margins might actually gain market share over a collection of companies that collectively decided not to compete with each other on margins./s

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

The rate of renewable construction however is still skyrocketing, which is why in a few years it is expected to not only be replacing new generation but quickly replacing existing generation as well. Hence why gobal carbon emissions are expected to peak sometime this or next year.

More to the point, even if all industry stoped and we ignored that the same industry is responsible for making all the replacements for fossil equipment, we would still be seeing vast increases in electricity consumption, as sectors that are currently run almost entirely fossil fuels like heating and transportation moved from fossil fuels to electricity.

While electric technologies like heat pumps and motors are thankfully twice to several times more energy efficient than furnaces, boilers, and engines, they still use vast quantities of electricity, and given that these sectors tend to be on par with if not significantly larger than the current electrical generation capacity, and as such replacing them with things that don’t inharently emit carbon will necessitate a vast increase in generation capacity.

If anything I’d think the idea that we can just improve the efficiency of things that emit carbon is what has long been proven unviable, as a more efficient furnace or gas car still inherently emits carbon while even a inefficient heat pump or metro does not.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

While the paper demonstrated strong diminishing returns in adding more data to modern neural networks in terms of image classifers, the video host is explaining how the same may effect apply to any nureal network based system with modern transformers.

While there are technically methods of generative AI that don’t use a neural network, they haven’t made much progress in recent decades and arn’t what most people mean when they hear or say generative AI, and as such I would say the title is accurate enough for a video meant for a general audience, though “Is there a fundamental limit to modern neural networks” might be more technically correct.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I used to think that a decade or so ago, but between things like the Texas districts profiting most from wind being the most against it to basically everything this congress has done, it is become increasingly clear that Trump successfully made ‘owning the libs’ the party’s primary platform.

They are already cheaper long term, near parity short term, and charging corridors have gone from just along freeways to most highways, but most Republicans will still call them useless vanity items because why would you give up the ‘freedom’ of gas.

You are taking about a party where a significant portion have been sold massive impractical pickup trucks that never get off the pavement because of marketing that a big expensive truck is ‘manly’ and ‘free’. In that paradime, where a car is a form of personal expression based on marketing, things like practically or cost are not going to be significant factors in decision making.

After all, if the practicality or cost were driving factors, every Republican would drive a Japanese sedan or van and bike everywhere they could.

Even if every quibble was solved, we’d still see pushback because ‘I just don’t like it’, or ‘rolling coal owns the libs’.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I believe a decent number of modern inverters and BMS’s have gotten around to adding a preset for them now. The steeper curve is definitely still a disadvantage compared to the LFP cells we’ve gotten used to.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

But if we don’t feed the entire internet into Siri, China would, and you don’t want China to have an advantage in the autocomplete wars, now do you?/s

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Except that isn’t really true, rates of young children interested in technical fields is pretty even. Moreover, up until the 1970s and 1980s, back when computers required far more technical knowledge to operate or repair, the field was almost exclusively comprised of women outside of managerial roles.

No small part of what changed was as computers become more important to industry and wages increased, for some reason home computers and especially new applications like gaming consoles were exclusively as toys for boys, and with women being required to near universally use male pseudonyms focus and popular perception shifted from the women who silently operate the IBM mainframe to the man writing code in the basement or startup by the 90s.

Practically gender roles have a lot more to do with how a field is perceived and how often kids are told ‘no, you don’t what to do that,’ or ‘that’s weird’, and especially how well they match with the image of the expected canadate in the head of the person hireing them. Even in your own comment you mention nursing, which is a far more technical role than say doctor or surgeon.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Cracking down on “illegal” immigration, exclusively targets legal immigrants showing for appointments at government offices, sounds about Right.

Surely randomly deporting legal immigrants can only going to lead to higher illegal imagination as people decide to not present themselves at the border in favor of banking on the shear impossibility of effectively survaling the entire country. But I imagine that is kind of the point, we need to manufacture a illegal imagination crisis but all we have is legal asylum seekers, so we better do something about that and bet that our electorate is too dumb to understand.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I’m not the specific target of the question since my family always turns out to vote, but I’d imagine some of the big ones are people not knowing that they have a legal right in many states to take paid time off work to vote, general apathy, voter suppression making it very difficult to vote in some areas, and given the swing in turnout between presidential and non presidential elections, a lot of people who only pay attention to the presidential elections because they get nationwide coverage dispite your local and district votes bro by a whole lot more important when it comes to effects on your life and keeping extremists from implementing their policies.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Not much, but April 12th saw the first person enter orbit, so I think this person is saying that Bush secretly helped prepare the way for the Soviet Union put Yuri Gagarin into space.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

How could that help at all? Seeing as the blockchain would have no way of telling the difference between human and Ai text, and if you could find a way to automatically verify that in way way that was so efficient you could expect all the text uploaded to the internet you could just run that program locally and not be beholden to people paying a fee to post anything to the internet.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I can’t imagine any sort of verification system not being completely overrun by bots/people on fiver/ mechanical turk immediately unless you tied it to meatspace IDs in an know your customer sort of way, in which case you would definitely need a central organization to do said verification, which eliminates any possible need for a blockchain as said organization can just use a faster, far cheaper, and most importantly for this application editable database.

More to the point, no one doubts that an article published by one organization was secretly published by another, but rather that they secretly used AI in the writing process, which also negates the system because that organization is never going to tell you which articles are done by AI, and any sort of reporting system for the entire organization or a specific author is just going to be immediately and constantly used to review bomb.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I regret that I have to be the one to inform everyone of this, but I fear MajorHavoc suffered an unfortunate accident caused by a computer glitch in an elevator control system three hours ago. They will be missed.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

They actually are where the push first stated on the right. After all, redefining antisemitism as being anti Israel is great if you’re primarily concerned with getting the Jews out of your country. Besides, it it’s fine that Isreal has citizenship decided on race and religion, isn’t it really antisemitic that we complain about doing the same thing here.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Friendly reminder for anyone who cries “free speech” whenever someone talks about libel laws or extending them to the internet. It’s true, or even just convincing a jury of your peers that you honestly believed it was true, is and always has been a perfect protection against libel and defamation. If you are complaining about it, it’s either because you’re area doesn’t have anti SLAPP laws or you don’t think what you said can meet even that bar.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

There are only what, 400 or so? Low single digits would still be a notable portion of the population.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

There is also a massive difference in user experience in China vs abroad, to the point where they might as well be two fundamentally different apps. Even just things like time limits for children exist by default in China and are unavailable elsewhere, which kind of feels like an admission that they only take things like platform safety seriously at home.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Or, how about we just cut the sports bugget back to what’s needed for the students to play without any spectators, and instead spend all that money on mayor hireing the adjuncts that actually teach the classes as full time staff.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Yep, it would be fascinating if it happens because not only would the US be comiting compete economic suicide and almost certainly take most of the gobal economy down with it to a decent degree thanks to the US dollar’s heavy use as a foreign reserve, but hyperinflation would hit his donors the hardest while wiping nearly all debts out of the US system.

Given the economic chaos the US stock market, realstate market, and retirement savings would all go down with it. The only possible winners to such a move are Russia, and to a lesser extent China and the EU.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Except we did see the working classes wages keep pace with and even outpace inflation in the last few years? Inflation has always been primarily a threat to the rich, who by the common definition make their money off of their savings, and so are directly affected by those savings diminishing in real value.

Similarly depts are nearly always denominated in the local currency and so are directly 1 to 1 diminished by the inflation of that currency. For example if you owe two hundred thousand on your mortgage and you see fifty percent inflation then you have effectively just been handed a hundred thousand in real value directly out of the pocket of the person who lent you that money.

None of this is to say that very high inflation is good in an economy where people need to save money for retirement, but it does have some silver linings for the poorest who already have depts rather than savings and who are generally paid in real value.

In a very high inflation scenario where the US was intentionally trying to devalue its currency I expect China would abandon its peg against the dollar, and everyone would likely try and reduce their dependency on the dollar, which would in turn probably lead to a feedback loop that would exacerbate the issue.

I would not expect anyone to come out of the almost certain gobal ressecion better off, except maybe Russia given how little they are tied to the gobal economy and how they’ve run down their forex reserves, but I imagine that unless every economist in China and the Eurozone takes the decade off they will come out of it a lot better off than the US would.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Firstly, I would generally roll the rise during the pandemic into the effects, as that’s when a lot of the inflation that would later be messured actually got going, and in this scenario you would likely see a similar effect to the whole, but I will consede that you likely much in the way in gains, especially given the effects such a recession would have across the board.

That does not have an effect on my main point, which is that a sustained very high inflation/hyperinflation during a loss of confidence crisis is going to do far, far more damage to people who’s source of income is earning a return on their assets and investments. In that earlier fifty percent inflation example you would need working class real wages to nearly half to have a similar effect.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Crontab dnf update -y and trust that if anything breaks uptime monitoing/ someone will let me know sooner or later.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Tire dust is a problem, but i’m not sure it counts as a very big one when compared to the sheer scale of the damage to both people and ecosystems climate change will do. Between ocean acidification and the subsequent collapse of marine life, more frequent and intense hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and droughts, it would take a lot for microplastics to enter the same scale of devistation wrought by over a hundreds of millions of cars dumping more than five metric tons per year of CO2 into the atmosphere.

To reduce microplastics in North America your looking at fighting the car obesity ecidemic, improving tire lifespan, convincing people to be more gentle on the accelerator, fixing the god forsaken mess that is trying to ship anyone less than a thousand tons of aggregate by rail, and of course reducing the number of people who try and use a car to get around a city by expanding rapid rail transit/ increasing telework opportunities.

Outside of maybe some incidental improvement in tire lifespan and chemistry though, I’m afraid I really don’t know how you expect a raceing circuit to be able to help with any of the above.

Police arrest NYU antiwar protesters; Calif. students form barricade ( www.washingtonpost.com )

Students protesting against the Israel-Gaza war continued to be met by police on Monday night, as a New York University encampment was cleared by the NYPD and students barricaded themselves inside a building at California State Polytechnic University at Humboldt, following dozens of arrests at Yale University....

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

To be fair, in the US there definitely is no shortage of dipshits who hear primarily Jewish apartheid ethnostate and are exclusively concerned with the Jewish part of that, and if a protest isn’t properly organized and moderated by its leaders some of them can slip in and cause incidents before they get thrown out by the protesters, so I can believe that there actual isolated antisemitic incidents.

All that being said, I definitely think that islamophobia is more prevalent in the US and that Palestinian and Muslim students are far more likely to be the target of such harassment. The media and certain politicians are definitely far more concerned about trying to conflate and describe all criticism of Israel as antisemitism while downplaying the danger to Palestinian students though, which is how you get a Democratic president fully agreeing with the open neo-nazi who was invited onto Fox News as a expert in antisemitism.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

To be fair, I don’t think Menino was campaigning against moderation, fact-checking, and constantly spreading hateful lies about vulnerable people all under the guise of free speech.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

In his case reporting a random town politician died because it’s April 1 is not much of a joke. Publishing a bunch of outlandish lies about someone who themselves constantly lies is also not much of a joke, but it is an excellent use of satire and turnabout.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

I found the article on the fake death and the consequences interesting. I just felt that the ethics of the situations are rather different.

These 150-foot-high sails could help solve shipping’s climate problem | Harnessing the power of wind could both reduce emissions from cargo ships and extend the life of these vessels ( wapo.st )

I'll also note that in an all-renewables world, we'll need a lot less shipping — about 40% of shipping today is moving fossil fuels around.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

In practice, the reasons why these don’t come standard dispite having been around in this form for over a hundred years tend to come down to boring things like adding a lot of mass high up on the ship and adding a not insignificant amount of maintenance for the crew in extange for a marginal improvement in fuel for a few types of ships.

They do have some effect no doubt, but you can achieve the same gains by just dropping a few knots off the ships speed with no other changes.

More to the point, they don’t really provide a pathway to zero emissions, just a few percent reduction. As such the focus is going to need to be on both alternative fuels that can be made carbon neutral or by reducing the need for them in the first place, which either through direct reductions is intercontental shiping or by prioritizing overland low tariff electrified rail along most routes. Build out zero carbon ways to get around the two major landmasses that have people on them and you just need ships to take the shortest path between them as well as the outlying islands.

Israel Attack on Iran Is What World War III Looks Like ( theintercept.com )

But this, in fact, is what actual war looks like these days: Sometimes it’s a volley of 300 missiles and drones, and sometimes it is lean, targeted, and carried out covertly. Gone are the days of vast conquering armies and conventional military confrontations between two parties. So long as experts, the government, and the...

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Even then, nations had engaged in total war for thousands of years, a World war is a war involving total war and major combat all over the world with few truly neutral nations. Nato/Japan/Korea/India vs Russia/China engageing in total war would probably count, but any definition kind of needs to not include conflicts like Korea or any of the internal European ones to make sense.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Yes, but a handful of conventional missiles going back and forth against symbolic targets is not a very useful definition of a war, much less a world war, if for no other reason than it is to broad to be useful. The on again/off again three way between India/China/Pakistan comes to mind, as might India and Canada if the definition goes much beyond that. The word war tends to imply that nations don’t have active trade between them for instance, and generally implies that at least one side is attempting to achieve some sort of military victory.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

All of the above are cases of one nations government killing a handful of another’s people for minor political posturing, and are all far more similar in scale to each other than say the US-Vietnam, Ukrainian, or even the undeclared Falklands war.

If the ultimate goal of a war is to force one nation
or group to surrender to another through military might, then I don’t think anyone in Israel expected Iran to surrender to them after they ‘accidentally’ blew up an embassy, nor do I expect anyone in Iran to have expected Israel to send an offer of surrender after they launched a single wave of largely outdated missiles against a handful of airfields.

In practice there are of course secondary effects, but the primary political motivation is internal, not external. Iran doesn’t expect Israel to surrender, but primarily wishes to reassure its public and keys to power that it can respond to military aggression. Israel does not wish Iran to surrender and end the ‘war’, it wishes to commit the US to giving it more resources while finding a situation in which it can play the victim.

So yes, I would say it is far more similar in scale, scope, and goal to assassinating a foreign citizen or sending a bunch of soldiers to beat another off ‘your’ land with nail studded sticks than it is sending tens of thousands of soldiers to occupy territory and replace the local government with your own.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Surrender of or the replacement of the government on that land or resources through military might either directly or indirectly is however the way control over those resources is achieved, and no, I am not just taking about total war, as one of my examples there was the Falkland’s war, which was not even close to a total war for either side.

Moreover your definition would seem not to apply to the current Iran- Israel conflict, as it is being discussed and decided on a case by case basis for both sides instead of an open and declared conflict.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

The ‘substantially heavier’ is doing a lot of work there, given the change is only about 5 to 10% on average and typically EV’s are still not the heaviest vehicles in their same class. Compared to the car obesity epidemic in North America, the drivetrain is irrelevant. A European EV for instance is nearly always going to far, far lighter than a modern US gas car.

Also, becuse if the road degradation is exponentially tied to tire wheight it is almost always a function of trucks, busses, and freeze thaw cycles, cars tend to be to light to cause significant share of the damage.

Break dust is an odd thing to bring up, seeing as one of the other common gripes with EVs is that they use their breaks so extremely rarely that they corrode and might be ineffective in an emergency.

Tire dust is an factor, but again one that’s more impacted by the increase in North America’s car size than drivetrain and which is reduced by getting cars back to sane sizes and out of dense areas like cities, not pretending that a 80 to 90% reduction in one of the largest causes of climate change is somehow the same.

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Actually, because of just how inefficient small scale combustion is and how much fuel goes into getting that gas to the car in the first place, even if you run an EV directly off the most polluting coal plant in the North America it’s still significantly better for the environment. Admittedly if you use a more average energy mixture, the benefit is far larger, but there is still a benefit.

Google fires 28 workers for protesting $1.2 billion Israel contract ( www.nbcnews.com )

"Google issued a stern warning to its employees, with the company’s vice president of global security, Chris Rackow, saying, “If you’re one of the few who are tempted to think we’re going to overlook conduct that violates our policies, think again,” according to an internal memo obtained by CNBC."

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

Probably, but I would much rather be a background character in the intro to a space opera instead.

Advice On Proposed Router Design

So I'm trying to build a router. Just need something to handle the networking in my house and the plan is to separate things out via virtual local area networks. Anyway, reading a bunch of threads and comments, I think my design will be something akin to this. Is this good or bad? Ultimately I wanna run OPNSense since that's...

sonori ,
@sonori@beehaw.org avatar

If you have a hypervisor in a home lab, which it turns out OP does not, odds are good your already running a DNS filter/ server, DHCP server, AD domain, etc so the whole network is down anyway during hypervisor restarts if you don’t have HA setup.

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