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MikeDunnAuthor

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MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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Curious why AOC and Bernie continue to stand with Biden, in spite of mounting calls for him to drop out by more mainstream and conservative members of the party?

Consider this: AOC, in her latest statement of support, said nothing about the genocide in Gaza.

Their continued support is part of a more coordinated party strategy to prevent popular opposition from escaping their control AND to prime the public for Biden's replacement, who will likely be someone far to the right of Biden in hopes of winning over conservative dems and independents in swing states.

MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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Today in Labor History July 20 1877: In the midst of the Great Upheaval (AKA Great Train Strike), the Maryland state militia fired on striking railroad workers in Baltimore, killing over 20, including children. The strike had started on July 14, in Martinsburg, WV, at the B&O Railroad yards. It quickly spread into Charleston, WV and Baltimore and Cumberland, MD. In Baltimore, as the 5th Regiment marched toward Camden Station with fixed bayonets on their Springfield rifles, crowds attacked them with bricks. Miraculously, no serious injuries occurred. However, when the 6th Regiment began their march, the crowds drove them off with paving stones and fists. Without orders, they began firing at the crowd, killing several. When the two regiments met at Camden Station, the crowds again hurled stones and bricks, disabling locomotives, tearing up tracks and driving off the engineers. They set fire to railroad cars and buildings and cut the firemen’s hoses when they tried to douse the flames.

The Great Upheaval came in the middle of the Long Depression, one of the worst depressions the U.S. has ever faced. My novel, “Anywhere But Schuylkill,” (hopefully out by year’s end) takes place in the years leading up to the Great Strike and is Part I of “The Great Upheaval” trilogy. I am currently working on Book II: “Red Hot Summer in the Smoky City.”

You can get my book at these indie retailers:
https://www.keplers.com/
https://www.greenapplebooks.com/
https://christophersbooks.com/

Read my complete article on the Great Upheaval here: https://michaeldunnauthor.com/2024/03/31/the-great-upheaval/

@bookstadon

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Today in Labor History July 20, 1934: Police shot at picketing strikers on Bloody Friday of the Minneapolis General Strike, killing two and wounding 67. The teamsters strike had begun in May. While the teamsters’ national leadership was conservative and opposed to strikes, Local 574, in Minneapolis, was affiliated with the Communist Party, and Local 544 was connected with the Trotskyist Communist League. They began organizing their members for a strike in spite of the national leadership. They effectively shut down nearly all transport in the city, except for food, which they permitted to prevent starvation. The police, and vigilantes working for the bosses, routinely attacked them on the picket line. Consequently, workers in other industries joined them in solidarity, leading to a General Strike. On July 20, as the cops tried escort scabs onto a worksite, picketers with clubs tried to block them. The cops opened fire with shotguns. An eyewitness said he saw a man stepping on his own intestines and another carrying his own severed hand.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr7cTjkAY14

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Today in Labor History July 20, 1934: Seattle police fired tear gas and clubbed 2,000 striking longshoremen during the West Coast port strike. Meanwhile, the governor of Oregon called out the National Guard to break the strike on the Portland docks. By the end of the strike, all the West Coast ports had become unionized. 1 worker died in Seattle and another died in Portland. And 2 in San Francisco. The San Francisco deaths led to a General Strike

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    "Did you know this iconic ska silhouette is a trans woman and ska singer named Brigitte Bond? The English Beat were inspired to draw her from a photo of her dancing with Prince Buster and it ended up being the inspiration for the now iconic “Rude Girl” silhouette. We’ve always been around and we’ve always been creative icons 💜🏳️‍⚧️🤘🏻"
    -Jenna Daugherty

    https://youtu.be/A7RNzArsQx8?t=373

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @eibhear can't wait to see her in sf

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Happy hour!

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    If you're in the SF Bay Area this weekend- Please come to the Workers Voices, weekend of labor story and song, July 20th and 21st.

    ($5-$15 donation requested to cover space rental and production costs, no one turned away for lack of funds)

    All Sessions will take place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church and Center of San Francisco - 1187 Franklin Street

    On Sunday, I'll be reading from my working-class historical novel, Anywhere But Schuylkill, with signed copies available.

    Here's what else will be happening:

    Session One:
    Saturday, July 20th, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., (Thomas Starr King Room)
    A Night of Solidarity Song, with The Freedom Song Network, South African/Civil Rights ensemble Vukani Mawethu, La Peña Community Chorus with freedom songs of the Americas and, the night’s honorees, Pat Wynne and the Rockin’ Solidarity Labor Heritage Chorus. Come, sing along and sing out for freedom!

    Session Two:
    Sunday, July 21st, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m., (the Chapel [not the Sanctuary])
    Labor Notes Conference/Area Organizing Campaigns Report Back and Discussion. Join Peter Olney, Organizing Director Emeritus of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, young organizers from Trader Joe's and Amazon campaigns, East Bay DSA and other workers’ organizations in motion to capture this wave, and see where it will take us.

    Session Three:
    Sunday, July 21st, 5:00 - 8:00 p.m., the Chapel
    Solidarity on Stage – An Evening of Labor Storytelling
    We will hear from working-class novelist MichaelDunn, picket-line chant leader Bill Shields, area spoken word artists and, our headliners, the domestic workers theater troupe, La Colectiva de Mujeres Original. ¿Se puede? ¡Si, se puede!

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    US Health Care Now Unaffordable for Nearly Half of Americans. But not to worry. With life expectancy on the decline, and the threat of nuclear annihilation and climate disasters, not to mention the impending fascist dictatorship, who has time to worry about luxuries like epipens and insulin?

    https://www.newsweek.com/us-healthcare-unaffordable-americans-1925972

    MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @nutmeg just to name a few...

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    The most that a working-class party could do, even if its politicians remained honest, would be to form a strong faction in the legislatures which might, by combining its vote with one side or another, win certain political or economic palliatives.
    But what the working-class can do, when once they grow into a solidified organization, is to show the possessing class, through a sudden cessation of all work, that the whole social structure rests on them; that the possessions of the others are absolutely worthless to them without the workers’ activity; that such protests, such strikes, are inherent in the system of property and will continually recur until the whole thing is abolished — and having shown that effectively, proceed to expropriate.

    Voltairine de Cleyre
    Direct Action

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    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Writing History, July 19, 1875: Alice Dunbar Nelson, American poet and activist was born. She was a prominent part of the Harlem Renaissance. She published her first collection of short stories and poems, “Violets and Other Tales,” in 1895. In 1910s, she co-founded the Equal Suffrage Study Club and was a field organizer for the woman's suffrage movement. In the 1920s-1930s, she was very active in the movements for African Americans' and women's rights, campaigned for the passage of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill and spoke in support of the Scottsboro defendants." She was married three times to men, but also had lesbian affairs on the side. Her first husband, Paul Laurence Dunbar, was also a Harlem Renaissance writer. He was an alcoholic, who raped and regularly beat her, one time nearly to death. He died in 1906 from tuberculosis and alcoholism. After his death, she taught high school and attended Cornell University. She was most active in organizing for women’s and African American rights in the 1920s-1930s.

    @bookstadon

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    Today in Labor History July 19, 1972: British SAS units helped the Omani government against the Popular Front for the Liberation of Oman rebels in the Battle of Mirbat, during the Dhofar Rebellion. The Front was a Marxist, pan-Arab nationalist group which wanted an independent state in Dhofar, free from Sultanic rule. They were supported by Communist Guerillas from South Yemen and received backing from both China and the USSR.

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    Today in Labor History July 19, 2012: The People's Protection Units (YPG) captured the city of Kobanî without resistance, starting the Rojava conflict in Northeast Syria. In 2014, The Kobani Canton declared autonomy from Syria. Supporters claim they have implemented a form of libertarian socialism, influenced by American anarchist Murray Bookchin, with decentralization, gender equality and local governance through direct democracy; created worker cooperatives and govern the through local councils, each with one male and one female co-president. The councils have gender quotas requiring at least 40% female participation. They have banned child marriages and honor killings. They are attempting to replace punitive justice with a system of restorative justice. And women play a prominent role on the battlefield, as well as within the political system. Yet private property remains a part of their system, which is inconsistent with Bookchinite anarchism. And according to Andrea Glioti, remnants of the PKK’s Stalinist past remain in Rojava. He cites the ubiquitous portraits of PKK leader Abdullah Ocalan, often accompanied by the slogan “There’s no life without a leader.”

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  • MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @sidereal They're also still at war against the state, with the threat of intervention by the US and others.

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    Today in Labor History July 19, 1979: Sandinista rebels overthrew the Somoza government in Nicaragua, ending the authoritarian 43-year Somoza family dynasty and replacing it with a revolutionary government. They instituted a program of mass literacy, gender equality and access to medical care. However, they also committed many human rights abuses, including the oppression and mass execution of indigenous people. The Sandinistas are named after Augusto Sandino, who led the rebellion against the U.S. occupation of Nicaragua in the 1930s. He was murdered by Somoza senior in 1934, launching the decades-long dictatorship. In the 1920s, Sandino lived in exile, in Mexico, where he was influenced by anti-imperialist, anarchist and communist revolutionaries, including the IWW. The original and modern Sandinista flags were influenced by the IWW’s anarcho-syndicalist red and black colors.

    The CIA orchestrated a Civil War between the Sandinistas and the right-wing Contras from 1984-1989. The Contras blew up rural schools and hospitals and routinely carried out rape and torture. In 1983, U.S. Congress passed the Boland Amendment, banning further aid to the Contrals. And in 1984, the International Court of Justice ruled that the U.S. prior support had been in violation of International law. However, even after the Boland Amendment, the Reagan administration continued to back the Contras by raising money from allies and covertly selling arms to Iran (then engaged in a war with Iraq), and funneling the proceeds to the Contras. In later Congressional hearings, when questioned for 8 hours, Reagan responded that he couldn’t remember at least 124 times, which was sufficient for Congress to absolve him of violating their own law, while National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Oliver North took much of the blame.

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Women’s History, July 19, 1848: The famous two-day Women's Rights Convention opened in Seneca Falls, New York, promoted as "a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman." Female Quakers organized the meeting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Many of the attendees opposed the inclusion of women’s suffrage in their Declaration of Sentiments. However, Frederick Douglass, who was the only African American attendee, argued strongly for its inclusion. As a result, attendees ultimately voted to retain the suffrage resolution.

    “Seneca Falls Inheritance,” by Miriam Grace Monfredo, is a historical novel that takes place in Seneca Falls at the time of the convention. Lisa Tetrault’s, “The Myth of Seneca Falls: Memory and the Women's Suffrage Movement, 1848-1898,” argues that the notion that Seneca Falls was the birthplace and the feminist movement was promoted, in part, to help Stanton and Anthony maintain centralized control of the movement. She further argues that the Seneca Falls myth downplays or eliminates the role of African American activists and abolitionists in the fight for women’s rights and suffrage.

    @bookstadon

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    MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @PacificNic Nice metaphor. Exactly. But it's also always been like this under capitalism.

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    Today in Labor History July 18, 1942: 15 Norwegian paramilitary guards helped members of the Nazi SS kill 288 political prisoners from Yugoslavia in the Beisfjord massacre. The Nazis had brought over 5,000 mostly Serbian political prisoners to Norway, as slave labor, to help build defenses against the Allies. Over 2,300 of them died in Norwegian prison camps. Overall, there were over 150,000 POWs, political prisoners, and slaver laborers, in Norway between 1941 and 1945. The majority were Soviets. Author Knut Flovik Thoresen wrote, in 2013: "You can be sure that if Norwegian prisoners had been exposed to similar [atrocities], then many of the perpetrators would have been sentenced to death. Instead, most were let off with sentences more lenient than those received by women who served as nurses at the front lines."

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    Today in Labor History July 18, 1966: Start of the 6-day Hough Uprising in Cleveland, Ohio. 1,700 National Guards intervened. 4 African Americans died. 50 people were injured. City officials blamed black nationalists and communists, but the real causes were poverty and racism. Over 66,000 people, lived in Hough. 90% of them were black. The neighborhood suffered from racially segregated and inferior schools, lack of routine garbage collection, no street cleaning, and 20% of all housing units officially dilapidated, many owned by absentee white landlords. Meanwhile, the racially segregated police stoked racial tensions. 20% of Cleveland's major crimes were committed in Hough, even though it had only 7% of the city's population, and only 165 of Cleveland's 2,100 police officers were African American. In 1963-1964, a coalition of African American civil rights groups led a nine-month protest campaign against the poor-quality, racially segregated schools and racial discrimination against blacks by labor unions. The protests were Cleveland's first large, racial protests, and their failure to achieve significant progress sent the message that negotiation and legal action produced only limited results.

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    MikeDunnAuthor , (edited ) to random
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    Are you ready for an eternity in hell?

    MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @raccoonformality @sterophonick

    A very common sentiment!

    thomas , to random German
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    Kurze Übersetzung des Beitrags von @MikeDunnAuthor Heute in der Geschichte der Arbeit - 17. Juli 1794: Der größte Sieg der Rebellen während der Whiskey-Rebellion ereignete sich an diesem Tag, als ein Mob von 500 bewaffneten Männern, die gegen eine neue Verbrauchssteuer für Brennereien protestierten, mit Truppen aus Fort Pitt zusammenstieß, nachdem sie auf einen Steuereintreiber geschossen und sein Haus niedergebrannt hatten. Viele der Aufständischen waren arme Farmer, die mit ihrem überschüssigen Getreide Schnaps herstellten, und Kriegsveteranen, die glaubten, immer noch gegen eine Besteuerung ohne Vertretung zu kämpfen.

    Innerhalb weniger Wochen wurden 13.000 uniformierte Milizionäre entsandt, um den Aufstand niederzuschlagen, darunter auch Finanzminister Alexander Hamilton (dessen Kumpels aus dem Rumgeschäft die größten Nutznießer der Steuer waren). Die meisten Aufständischen gaben auf und gingen nach Hause, bevor die Soldaten eintrafen. Sie nahmen jedoch 20 Männer fest, die meisten wurden jedoch aufgrund von Verwechslungen freigesprochen. Nur zwei Männer wurden verurteilt und zum Tode durch den Strang verurteilt. Sie wurden jedoch von Washington begnadigt. Außerdem waren die Behörden nicht in der Lage, die Steuern für viele der Brennereien im östlichen Kentucky und im westlichen Pennsylvania einzutreiben.

    Dennoch wurde Washingtons Reaktion als Erfolg gewertet, da er bewies, dass die nationale Regierung sowohl den Willen als auch die Fähigkeit besaß, den Widerstand der Bevölkerung gegen ihre Gesetze zu unterdrücken. Außerdem schuf er einen Präzedenzfall dafür, welche Arten von Protest die neue Regierung tolerieren würde. Die Rebellen hatten geglaubt, dass die Amerikanische Revolution das Volk als souveränes Volk etabliert hatte, das das Recht hatte, die Regierung mit Gewalt zu ändern. Im Gegensatz dazu waren die Föderalisten in der Regierung der Ansicht, dass die Regierung souverän war, weil sie mit Zustimmung des Volkes eingesetzt worden war.

    Susanna Rowson schrieb ein Theaterstück mit dem Titel "The Volunteers" (1795), in dem die Milizionäre die Helden der Whiskey-Rebellion waren. Sie war auch eine frühe Verfechterin der Frauenbildung und eine Abolitionistin. Ihr Roman "Charlotte Temple" war der populärste amerikanische Roman bis zu Harriet Beecher Stowes "Onkel Toms Hütte". L. Neil Smith schrieb einen alternativen historischen Roman, "The Probability Broach" (1980), in dem die Rebellen gewinnen und Washington wegen Hochverrats hinrichten. David Liss veröffentlichte "The Whiskey Rebels" (2008), eine weitere historische Fiktion über die Rebellion.

    Quelle: https://kolektiva.social/@MikeDunnAuthor/112802704813351901

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor ,
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    @thomas thanks for the translation

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    Today in Labor History July 17, 1944: Two ammunition ships exploded at Port Chicago, CA (now known as the Concord Naval Weapons Center). The explosion killed 322 sailors, including 202 African-Americans assigned by the Navy to handle explosives. The explosion could be seen 35 miles away in San Francisco, across the Bay. In response, 258 African-Americans refused to return to the dangerous work, initiating what would be known as the Port Chicago Mutiny. 50 of the men were convicted and sentenced to hard labor. 47 were released in 1946. During their court proceedings, Thurgood Marshall, working then for the NAACP, prepared an appeal campaign, noting that only black men had been assigned to the dangerous munitions loading job. At the time, navy had over 100,000 black sailors, but no black officers. Beginning in 1990, a group of 25 Congressional leaders began a campaign to exonerate the mutineers. However, Congress did not exonerate the men until 2019.

    In the 1980s, activists regularly protested at the Concord Naval Weapons Center against U.S. arms shipments to the Contras in Nicaragua. These shipments were supposedly secret, and illegal under the Congressional Boland Amendment. The base shipped 60,000 to 120,000 tons of munitions each year to U.S. forces and allies, including the Contras. On September 1, 1987, a weapons train ran over veterans who were blockading the tracks, including Brian Willson, who lost both of his legs, and a portion of his frontal lobe, in the collision. Days later, activists dismantled the train tracks. And for years after, activists maintained a 24-hour vigil at the site. The FBI had been surveilling Willson for more than a year as a “domestic terrorist,” even though all of his activism and protests had been entirely nonviolent. The train crew had been told to not stop the train, even if protesters were on the tracks.

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    Today in Labor History July 17, 1913: Seattle’s Potlatch Riots began, when soldiers and sailors brawled with members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) during Seattle’s Potlatch Festival. Alden Blethen, publisher of the "Seattle Times," who hated free speech and feared "radical elements," had been fanning the flames of reaction against the IWW and local activists. He was highly critical of liberal Mayor Cotterill for allowing IWW organizers and anarchists to speak publicly in downtown Seattle. His red-baiting led to violence, as soldiers and sailors ransacked IWW and Socialist headquarters. The riots, which followed were essentially an attempt to suppress free speech and labor organizing, and were a harbinger of the nationwide red scare leading up to and following World War I. In response to the riots, Mayor Cotterill declared an emergency, took control of the police, shut down saloons, banned street speaking and attempted to temporarily shut down the Times.

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    Today in Labor History July 17, 1794: The biggest rebel victory of the Whiskey Rebellion occurred on this date when a mob of 500 armed men, protesting a new excise tax on distilleries, clashed with troops from Fort Pitt after firing on a revenue collector and burning down his home. Many of the rebels were poor farmers, who made spirits with their excess grain, and war veterans, who believed they were still fighting against taxation without representation.

    Within weeks, 13,000 uniformed militiamen were sent in to quash the rebellion, including Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton (whose buddies in the rum business were the major benefactors of the tax). Most of the rebels gave up and went home before the soldiers arrived. However, they did arrest 20 men, but most were acquitted due to mistaken identity. Only two men were convicted and sentenced to hang. However, Washington pardoned them. Furthermore, the authorities were unable to collect taxes on many of the distilleries in eastern Kentucky and Western Pennsylvania.

    Nevertheless, Washington’s response was seen as successful because he demonstrated that the national government had both the will and ability to suppress popular resistance to its laws. Furthermore, it set a precedent for what types of protest the new government would tolerate. The rebels had believed the American Revolution had established the people as sovereign, with the right to change the government by force. In contrast, the Federalists in the government believed that the government was sovereign because it had been established with the consent of the people.

    Susanna Rowson wrote a play called “The Volunteers” (1795) in which the militiamen were the heroes of the Whiskey Rebellion. She was also an early advocate for women’s education and an abolitionist. Her novel “Charlotte Temple” was the most popular American novel until Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s cabin.” L. Neil Smith wrote an alternative historical fiction novel, “The Probability Broach,” (1980) in which the rebels win and execute Washington for treason. David Liss published “The Whiskey Rebels” (2008), another historical fiction piece about the rebellion.

    @bookstadon

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    Mural commemorating the 1934 San Francisco General Strike, located in the old Rincon district, where the bloody strike took place. 2 workers were killed by police: Howard Sperry and Nick Bordoise.

    MikeDunnAuthor , (edited ) to random
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    Plaque commemorating the 1934 San Francisco General Strike.

    Reads: In memory of Howard Sperry and Nick Bourdoise, who gave their lives on Bloody Thursday July 5, 1934 so that all working people might enjoy a greater measure of dignity and security.

    Sperry and Bordoise were fatally shot by San Francisco police at the intersection of Mission and Steuart Streets, when longshoremen and seamen attempted to stop maritime employers from breaking their joint strike. Community outrage at these killings sparked a General Strike by all San Francisco unions.

    The maritime strike continued through the middle of summer, concluding with a union victory which brought decent conditions to the shipping industry and set the stage for the rebirth of a strong and democratic labor movement on the west coast.

    "An Injury to One is an Injury to All"

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    Today in Labor History July 16, 1934: The San Francisco General Strike began. The longshoremen’s strike actually started on May 9 and lasted 83 days, leading ultimately to the unionization of all West Coast ports. The strike grew violent quickly, with company goons and police brutalizing longshoremen and sailors. They hired private security to protect the scabs they brought in to load and unload ships, housing them in moored ships and wall compounds that the strikers attacked. In San Pedro, two workers were killed by private security on May 15. Battles also broke out in Oakland, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle. On Bloody Thursday, July 5, in San Francisco, police attacked strikers with tear gas and with clubs while on horseback and later fired into the crowd, killing two and injuring others. A General Strike was called on July 14 and began on July 16, lasting 4 days. Many non-unionized workers joined the strike. Movie theaters and night clubs shut down. Many small businesses shut down & posted signs in solidarity with the strikers.

    On July 17, the cops arrested 300 people they accused of being communists, radicals or subversives. The National Guard also blocked both ends of Jackson Street that day with machine gun-mounted trucks to aid vigilante attacks on the Marine Workers Industrial Union headquarters and the ILA soup kitchen. They raided many other union halls and communist organizations. Vigilantes kidnapped and beat a lawyer for the ACLU, as well as 13 radicals from San Jose, CA.

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    Today in Labor History July 16, 1916: Carlo Tresca and other IWW strike leaders were arrested on charges of inciting the murder of a deputy. This was during a strike of 30,000 iron-ore mine workers of the Mesabi range in northern Minnesota. Tresca was an Italian-American IWW organizer and newspaper editor. He opposed fascism, Stalinism and mafia-infiltration of unions. He was assassinated in 1943. Some believe the Soviets killed him in retaliation for his criticism of Stalin. The most recent research suggests it was the Bonanno crime family, in response to his criticism of the mafia and Mussolini. Tresca wrote two books. His autobiography was published posthumously in 2003. He also wrote a book in Italian, “L'attentato a Mussolini ovvero il segreto di Pulcinella.”

    @bookstadon

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    Today in Labor and Writing History July 16, 1862: Ida B Wells was born, Holly Springs, Mississippi. She was most famous for her nation-wide anti-lynching campaign, launched after the murder of three black businessmen in Memphis, Tennessee. Wells was born into slavery, in Mississippi, and spent her lifetime fighting racism and prejudice. She worked as a journalist, where she documented lynchings. She also founded the NAACP. Her autobiography, “Crusade for Justice,” was published posthumously in 1970.

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    Today in Labor History 7/16/1877: The Great Railway Strike (Great Upheaval) began in Martinsburg, WV, with strikes spreading across the country, despite the unions, which tried to block it. Boatmen, steelers, miners & workers of all ages, genders & races joined in. Militias & national guards were deployed. For the 1st time ever, federal troops were used to crush a strike. Workers fought back with rocks & bricks. They sabotaged equipment. Dumped railroad cars. Rerouted engines. Many of the poorly paid soldiers went AWOL & joined the strikers. In Lebanon, PA, they mutinied. Karl Marx called it “the first uprising against the oligarchy of capital since the Civil War.”

    In Chicago & St. Louis, strikes were led by the communist Workingmen’s Party, affiliated with the First International. In Chicago, future Haymarket martyr, Albert Parsons, gave a fiery speech. In St. Louis, workers took over & ran the city for a week in what became known as the St. Louis Commune (after the Paris Commune of 1871). At a huge meeting in St. Louis, a black man asked: “Will you stand with us regardless of color?” The crowd replied: “We will!”

    The Great Upheaval ended after 45 days, with over 100 workers slaughtered. In Pittsburgh, the militia killed 20 workers in 5 minutes. In Chicago, they killed another 20. In Scranton, up to 50 were killed. In the aftermath, unions became better organized, particularly the new Knights of Labor, which mushroomed in size. But the bosses learned many lessons, too. Many of the old stone armories we see across the country today were built after the Great Upheaval to provide cities with greater fire power for the next great strikes.

    My novel, "Anywhere But Schuylkill," is part of the "Great Upheaval" trilogy. You can get a copy from these indie booksellers:
    https://www.keplers.com/
    https://www.greenapplebooks.com/
    https://christophersbooks.com/

    And from: https://www.amazon.com/Anywhere-but-Schuylkill-Michael-Dunn-ebook/dp/B0CJVW1BP2

    You can read my full article on the Great Upheaval here: https://michaeldunnauthor.com/2024/03/31/the-great-upheaval/

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    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Today in Labor History July 15, 1927: The July Revolt of 1927 began in Vienna. It ended with police firing into the crowd and killing 89 protesters. Additionally, five police died. Over 600 protestors and roughly 600 policemen were injured. The clash was the culmination of a conflict between the Social Democratic Party of Austria and a right-wing alliance of wealthy industrialists and the Catholic Church.

    #workingclass #LaborHistory #vienna #revolt #rebelion #uprising #police #PoliceBrutality #acab #massacre

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Today in Labor History July 15, 1955: Eighteen Nobel laureates sign the Mainau Declaration against nuclear weapons, later co-signed by thirty-four other Nobel laureates. Werner Heisenberg (shown pictured), of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, was 1 of the signers. A new Mainau Declarion was signed in 2015. This one calls for urgent action on the Climate Crisis.

    Part of the original Mainau Declaration reads as follows:

    We do not deny that perhaps peace is being preserved precisely by the fear of these weapons. Nevertheless, we think it is a delusion if governments believe that they can avoid war for a long time through the fear of these weapons. Fear and tension have often engendered wars. Similarly, it seems to us a delusion to believe that small conflicts could in the future always be decided by traditional weapons. In extreme danger no nation will deny itself the use of any weapon that scientific technology can produce. All nations must come to the decision to renounce force as a final resort. If they are not prepared to do this, they will cease to exist.

    While both threats remain, the nuclear threat will destroy the planet, and life on it, much more suddenly. And the U.S. and Western European powers, including Israel, seem much more prepared to use them than any time in the past. Indeed, in part because of this increasing willingness to use nuclear weapons, willingness to escalate military conflicts that risk nuclear miscalculation, and the rapid proliferation of a new nuclear arms race between the U.S., Russia, and China, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (founded by Einstein and Oppenheimer in 1945) pushed the Doomsday Clock forward to 90 seconds before midnight, the closest it has ever come to Armageddon (at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis it was at 2 min. before midnight). The first paragraph of their current status warning reads:

    “Ominous trends continue to point the world toward global catastrophe. The war in Ukraine and the widespread and growing reliance on nuclear weapons increase the risk of nuclear escalation. China, Russia, and the United States are all spending huge sums to expand or modernize their nuclear arsenals, adding to the ever-present danger of nuclear war through mistake or miscalculation.”
    https://thebulletin.org/doomsday-clock/current-time/

    #peace

    ALT
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  • MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Support your radical militant librarians....
    and ALL librarians who are under attack.

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Fire your boss!

    MikeDunnAuthor , to random
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    Today in Labor History July 14, 1912: Folk singer Woody Guthrie was born. During World War II, he wrote the song "Talking Hitler's Head Off Blues." Around this time, he also painted THIS MACHINE KILLS FASCISTS on his guitar. He saw fascism as a “form of economic exploitation similar to slavery.” During the Great Depression, he romanticized the deeds of outlaws like Jesse James and Pretty Boy Floyd as legitimate acts of social responsibility and protest against those who were responsible for the worsening social and economic conditions of working class people.

    ALT
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    Today in Labor History July 14, 1896: Legendary Spanish anarchist and military strategist Buenaventura Durruti was born. Durruti helped organize attacks on the government of dictator Miguel Primo de Riviera in 1923. He was influential in the anarchist federation FAI and the syndicalist union CNT. He is probably best known for leading thousands of anarchist troops (the Durruti Column) against the Franco dictatorship.

    MikeDunnAuthor OP ,
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    @LevZadov I have that bookchin book. It's good

    aral , to random
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    A corporation will pay the least amount it can get away with for labour. If that number is zero, then that number is zero. Understand that and you understand slavery (both modern-day and historical), the prison-industrial complex, open source (not free software), privatisation, conservatism, and much else about the world around you.

    MikeDunnAuthor ,
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    @Threadbane @aral

    "A new mule costs $100, but mule boys are a dime a dozen."

    from Anywhere But Schuylkill.
    Available from these indie retailers:
    https://www.keplers.com/
    https://www.greenapplebooks.com/
    https://christophersbooks.com/

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